Blog

Potential First Chapter Problems

This year I was asked to be a judge in the first rounds of the ACFW Genesis Contest, a national fiction writer’s contest for unpublished writers. Since this was the same contest I finaled in last May, I wanted to give back to the contest that had done so much to launch my writing career.

So, in my “spare” time over the past few weeks, I’ve been reading contest entries. I usually read the entry all the way through to get a feel for the story. Then I go back through it again more slowly, making notes in the margins. Finally, when I’m done, I fill in both pages of the score sheet.

I count it a privilege to read the work of other aspiring writers. I know each one of them poured their hearts into their stories. I was in their position only last year, biting my nails, wondering what the judges would think of my work, waiting for that all-important feedback.

Each entry is no longer than 15 pages. I’ve never believed 15 pages is long enough to determine the worth of a story—anyone can polish up the first chapter but it takes infinitely more skill to weave the entire plot to a believable and satisfying conclusion.

While 15 pages can’t give the whole picture, I’ve realized it is enough to come to conclusions about the author’s writing skills. I’m beginning to understand why an agent can make a clear-cut decision about whether to pursue a query based on sample pages. If a writer doesn’t have a grasp of basic fiction-writing techniques, that jumps out from the first line and paragraph. And likewise, if they’ve practiced their skills, that’s evident too.

In the entries I’ve judged so far, I’ve noticed a few common first chapter “mistakes.” Here’s a short list:

Not opening with a strong enough hook. The first line. The first paragraph. Even more than that, the first scene. Each one is extremely critical and should be crafted to bait the reader into needing to find out more. I might be able to forgive a mediocre first line, but the first scene must draw me in to the story.

Waiting to begin the “real” tension and conflict. Several contest entries began with the main characters reflecting on life, thinking about their current or past situation, or contemplating doing certain activities.

First chapters should contain very little if any static. That includes conversations, meetings, or meals between characters simply for the purpose of conveying story information. It would be like writing a phone conversation and asking our reader to “watch” the characters talk to each other. How exciting is that?

Instead, find the first major conflict of the external & internal plot lines and start in the middle of them.

Too much setting up of the story. Readers don’t need to know how our characters got to the point they’re at. Throw our characters into the story and for the first chapter pretend the reader already knows as much as we do.

Readers want to piece the story together on their own. We’ll give them a more fulfilling reading experience if we let them take our small hints and finally put the character’s past together in their own time. And if we need to explain anything, we can always slide it in little by little later.

Character confusion. We can confuse our readers with too many characters in the first chapter. And we can also confuse them if we don’t put the spotlight on our main characters right away. Readers want to empathize and relate with the main character(s) from the get go.

Using too many clichés. Every writer should steer away from overused phrases, especially in the first chapter. They jump out and brand an author as amateur. We should always be striving to find unique and fresh ways to express emotions and descriptions, but it’s particularly important for the first chapter.

I’ve also noticed the tendency to use clichéd characters, reactions, and plot lines. My test for deciding if something is clichéd is this: if it sounds even vaguely like something I’ve read somewhere else, then it probably isn’t unique. If it has even a hint of cliché, then I need to dig deeper into my mental recesses and come up with something fresher.

Summary: When writing for the modern reader, the first chapter is critical. We have to captivate them in the opening pages or we might lose them altogether.

What other problems have you noticed with first chapters? Is there a particular area in your opening that you struggle with the most? And on a different note, do you think you if you were a judge or agent you could make a fair assessment about a writer’s skill from the first chapter?

314 comments:

  1. Great stuff! I agree with all of it. There needs to be a hook and tension/conflict needs to be apparant right away.

    Another thing is the importance of scenes. I need to be immersed in the story - like I'm watching a movie - right away. The only way to do this is when the writer writes via scenes (with a goal, a motivation, and a conflict to that goal).

    What category are you judging? Historical Romance? Just curious if you judge the same category you finaled in.

    ReplyDelete
  2. The first chapter is very important, but you're right it takes the whole story to see if it works. The problem I'm having with my WiP right now is that the beginning and end seem fine but there is so much in between that's just fluff.

    Thanks for posting this. I feel very confident about my first chapter now. Maybe I'll enter this contest next year.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Katie,

    I agree. Writing scene by scene is very important--if not THE main way to write nowadays. The problem I've seen with some first and second scenes is the static energy. We can't start our opening scenes with reflections, conversations, or meetings between friends in order to set up the story. Those kinds of slow-moving scenes usually delay the action of the main plot.

    And in answer to your question, I'm judging historical romance, which is what I write and felt I would be most qualified to critique. :-)

    ReplyDelete
  4. Great list. I have been working my way through it during my re-writes. I was pleased to see I had thought through the ones on your list. Thanks Jody. Great post as always.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Jody, I agree with you on every one of these problems. Here's another one that I've encountered in my reading as recently as yesterday. It's a real turn-off for me when the author shifts points of view within the first scene. Not going to a different POV in a subsequent scene, but a shift right in the middle of the action. That's like accidentally shifting into reverse instead of second gear: sort of jarring.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Love this!

    Yes, I DO think you can tell a ton by the first 15 pages. There are a lot of people, I'm sure that, that do polish the first chapters more than the rest of the book, which leads to rejections after partial/full requests, but I think you can see if a writer as "potential" by just reading a short section at the beginning.

    I think you are spot on in identifying problems... For me, my problem was that the first and second chapters didn't match in tone. I got a ton of comments that while my first chapter was funny and entertaining, it clashed with my 2nd chapter and it was jarring, and my 2nd chapter was better writing.

    Of course... I rewrote my first chapter and while not perfect I'm sure, I think it's much better. I'm REALLY curious to see if the scores differ this year than last year in the Genesis given the major rehaul of the first chapter.

    ReplyDelete
  7. I struggle with beginnings. Period. There, I said it. Beginnings are the hardest for me. The setting is actually a very important element of my book so finding a way to describe it without tipping over into B-O-R-I-N-G, was challenging. I've rewritten my beginning more than any part of my book, and I'm still not 100% satisfied with it. So, I will definitely be interested to see what judges say about it.

    I used to doubt that an agent or editor could possibly know enough just by reading the first chapter, but I've changed that opinion since I started reading, writing and studying the craft.

    ReplyDelete
  8. I think you can get a strong sense of voice in the first chapter. I often make my decision whether to keep reading or not based on that first chapter.

    And I love that you wrote "spare" time. It's cool you're giving back, Jody.

    ~ Wendy

    ReplyDelete
  9. And not only the first chapter, but lately, having read a lot of query letters - I can totally see how they can make a judgement just based on this measly 250 words.

    Great post, Jody! Thanks.

    ReplyDelete
  10. This is helpful! I'm working my way through your list as I revise. Thanks for sharing what you've learned!

    ReplyDelete
  11. This hopefully speaks well to the recent changes I've made in manuscript, which I may finally enter in Genesis next year, if I don't have a contract.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Thank you for the helpful tips. Sounds like judging a contest can teach you more about writing than entering one!

    ReplyDelete
  13. Great points!! I totally agree with all them and am learning to apply them myself. The other big thing that I notice in first chapters that I would label a "mistake" would be too much description of where the character is. This is so true in historicals where the author wants to convey every ounce of research they've completed. As a reader, I end up feeling like i'm reading a historical documentary instead of a novel.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Oh, Jody, this is REALLY great.

    I'm bookmarking it for future reference.

    What a skillful teacher you are!

    ReplyDelete
  15. Wonderful advice here, Jody, as always. As I move more into writing fiction, your posts will be of great support and help. Thank you.
    Karen

    ReplyDelete
  16. Jody,

    What you're saying is very important. I once polled about 100 editors and agents (CBA & ABA) about how far they read before they KNOW.

    Close to 97% of them said they know by page 10. Over 50% of them know by the end of page 1.

    Great blog. Keep up the good work and thanks for serving ACFW and your fellow writers by judging the Genesis.

    Cheryl

    ReplyDelete
  17. Great info, thanks so much. I know that one thing that stands out to me is trying to keep the characters straight. Sometimes I have to go back through and review who they are and what relationship they have to each other. I always think it's just me, but I guess not:)
    Blessings,
    Karen

    ReplyDelete
  18. I've been privileged to serve as a judge in a number of contests. Like you, Jody, I've learned a great deal from the experience. I used to wonder how an agent or editor could make a decision on a project based on so few pages. Not anymore. I get a feel for a writer's skill and storytelling abilities quickly.

    Your points are great. To add to your list, I've read entries where the scene isn't set up. I don't know where I am or when. As Jamie said, a writer can include too much description, but I look for the basics. Are the characters inside or outside; in a city or the country; in the middle of a blizzard in Anchorage or on a sun-drenched beach in Miami. If the story is a historical, it's important to know the time period and location and to have enough description to feel grounded in the setting.

    Most RWA® chapter contests have judges look for use of sensory details. Is this something Genesis judges are asked to look for as well?

    ReplyDelete
  19. I've been wrestling with my own beginning lately. I'm trying to determine if I'm starting it at just the right place. These are all great tips.

    ReplyDelete
  20. I've been spending quite a bit of time on Genesis entries too, and I agree with your findings. Probably the biggest thing I've noticed is the lack of conflict. I can see seeds planted that may or may not bloom later, but it's definitely something for all of us to watch for in our own work.

    ReplyDelete
  21. This is great advice. I've struggled with where to begin my story. I started one place, went back further then eventually went back to where I was to begin with. (not sure if that made sense).

    I think finally I have a first chapter that instills all of your advice.

    ReplyDelete
  22. Thank you for posting these! I so needed it today.
    I just got a critique back from someone in my writing group. She was very gracious with her time, and I appreciate it. I'm still working on taking things professionally instead of personally, and this reminded me that I didn't do too badly.

    There's also a part I think she and I may have to agree to disagree about though. A change that didn't sit right with me, but after reading this, I have a little more confidence in my decision.

    Thank you again!

    ReplyDelete
  23. to Linda Kage: I was thinking the same thing. Sounds like judging a contest is a rapid fire way to learn what has been said authors could learn by joining a critique group and critiquing others instead of just polishing their own work.

    Jody, thanks! Another great blog! I agree – it shows the more I learn about this industry the more common complaints people make about the business practices of agents/editors fall away. I've gone to the library and checked out stacks of books - that somewhere along the way several people believed were worthy of being published - and within just pages, sometimes just sentences, I could toss many aside. Whether I believed the book wasn't good or it just didn't fit my tastes I didn't care to continue reading it. I'd imagine agents get that feeling much more often and really even if your work is stellar why would you want an agent that feels that way to be the one to represent you?

    ReplyDelete
  24. Yikes, I'm in it. I wonder if you've judged mine??? Anyway, GREAT tips and I agree on all points. I look for the same things in books that I'm reading.

    ReplyDelete
  25. As I've mentioned before, I've judged for two contests this year, and I think your points are spot on. I was really surprised how quickly you can tell if the pages are going to be good or not. Often by the end of the first paragraph, I could predict how good the entry was going to be.

    I think one thing I noticed is people taking the start with action thing too far. When I'm thrown into major action and haven't been given at least a tidbit to connect with the character on, I just don't care what happens to them.

    I also think a blah voice is one of the major turn offs for me too. I need to hear the voice very quickly in a first chapter.

    Great tips!

    ReplyDelete
  26. Good stuff! My first novel starts right in the middle of the action, but I'm really struggling with the start of my second. I've written scenes and chapters from later in the book, but I just don't have a handle yet on a good opening scene.

    ReplyDelete
  27. What an honor to be chosen to judge the contest, Jody. And thank you for the great advice on first chapters. I'm working on revising the first chapter of one of my novels right now, for fear it isn't strong enough. It's one I've struggled with and struggled with, too, primarily trying to get that all-important hook into the first paragraph or two.

    ReplyDelete
  28. I have changed my opening line, paragraph and scene, so many times. Each time, it has been after learning something new. Thank goodness for you, Jodi and others who give such great tips and information. I can see the improvement each time I change things up and it reads better and better.
    Thank you so much!

    ReplyDelete
  29. Beginnings are tough. Even though I know what makes for a great beginning, I still haven't locked down one yet that I feel really hooks the reader. I do think one of the most important things is being able to get a feel for the voice within the first page.

    ReplyDelete
  30. Great post. I've been writing about this sort of thing the past couple of weeks, too. Writers really need to understand what they can do to make an okay beginning become a hard-to-put down novel.

    Great post!

    Lynnette Labelle
    http://lynnettelabelle.blogspot.com

    ReplyDelete
  31. Wonderful post, Jody! The hardest one for me is cliched plot lines. It seems like every plot has been done before, but I work really hard to make sure I have a unique twist.

    ReplyDelete
  32. These are all really great things to think about. I mentally reviewed my first chapter as I was reading this post and I think I'm doing okay. But I do need to go back and give it another look.

    ReplyDelete
  33. I give you so much credit for taking time out of your busy schedule to help other authors this way.

    Your list sums it up! A big problem for me is when the first chapter doesn't show anything out of the ordinary happening to the main character. Some problem or shift in the character's life should be occurring or why bother writing it.

    ReplyDelete
  34. Jody; You hit the nails on the head. Oops, cliche' alert!

    I have quit reading books that don't captivate me on the first or second chapter. Mostly because the character's responses don't seem genuine to me, or the plot is boring.

    What frustrates me is that some of these books are written by well-known authors.

    I do think I could tell from 15 pages if a writer's work was publishable, but as Rachelle says, "It's so subjective." You have to catch the eye of the agent that loves your style of writing.

    Oh dear.

    ReplyDelete
  35. The first chapter is everything. One problem I’ve come across when reading a few published books is first chapter confusion. It jumps all over the place without any transition or explanation.

    For me, I had issues deciding where to end the first chapter. I think when I start my revision process breaks will clearer.

    ReplyDelete
  36. It's cool that you're reinforcing points I've read a number of times elsewhere. It's also a timely reminder as I'm in the middle of a rewrite.

    ReplyDelete
  37. At SiWC conferences, I've participated in "So You Think You Can Write" workshops where the first couple pages are submitted anonymously to a panel of agents and editors. A well-known author reads them aloud, and reading continues until at least two agents raise their hands to indicate that's where they would quit reading -- like a gong show. Their hands went up instantly whenever weather was mentioned or the MC was either dreaming or just waking up. They said those kind of beginnings have been done to death.

    I was surprised at how many of them turned up during the readings. I was also surprised at how often the first page was some other form of passive description -- for example, description of the neighbourhood as MC is driving somewhere, the view from a cruise ship deck, or the interior of a room.

    I think writers who read lots will be better prepared to recognize cliched beginnings.

    ReplyDelete
  38. You always give out such great information, Jody. Your posts are a joy to read.

    I have left something over at my blog for you. Enjoy!

    ReplyDelete
  39. This line is very helpful for me - "That includes conversations, meetings, or meals between characters simply for the purpose of conveying story information"

    I've heard variations of this tip, but your phrasing makes this concept very clear.

    ReplyDelete
  40. Good stuff. In some ways I resent the need to "hook" the reader, jump into the plot and deliver slimmed-down, streamlined prose. I feel more like Miniver Cheevy with each passing day.
    As for character confusion, I am guilty as charged. Ironically, I had no idea of my guilt until I started hearing from readers of my first novel who complained about the number of characters introduced early, most of whom didn't factor in the story.

    ReplyDelete
  41. This is fabulous stuff Jody. The first book I wrote was filled with back story in the first several chapters. I didn't even realize that was wrong until I started reading blogs and researching a little more.

    The other thing that screams beginner (at least for me) is writing that is peppered with adverbs and adjectives. People who have been writing for a while don't seem to need or want to dress up their words.

    ReplyDelete
  42. You really do have an educator's brain, Jody, as well as a writer's. Very good insight here and one I'll be referring to as I flesh out future first chapters and refine WIP chapters. I struggle with wanting to explain too much -- always working on that one. And now, I have even more motivation to stay away from this, thinking of it from the editor's eye.

    ReplyDelete
  43. Ok, I'm going to do some major ripping of a first chapter of one of my books,. I've got him in action the first paragraph and last but intbetween I am doing my set-up!

    ReplyDelete
  44. I feel confident I could judge the writer's composition skill from reading fifteen pages. I doubt that I could judge the quality of the story itself, especially if the plot is complex and contains several different elements.

    However, agents only have so much time, and if I were one myself, I know I would have to limit how much of it I could give each submission.

    ReplyDelete
  45. Thank you for such an informative post! And congrats on your own win.

    ReplyDelete
  46. I liked your point about "watching characters talk to each other." I just finished a book that had scene after scene of dialog, which grated on me, but I couldn't put my finger on why. Now I know. It's a static way of writing.

    ReplyDelete
  47. What a great list of things to think about. I think I'm most guilty of the character confusion one. I want to get them on the page, doing things, and I tend to overload.

    I do think you can get a sense of a person's ability from the first chapter, and definitely by page 15.

    ReplyDelete
  48. Such a terrific post, Jody! This is crucial to keep in mind as you craft that first chapter. We've included it on our blog today! Thanks for the helpful tips.

    ReplyDelete
  49. Wow, Jody! Very, very good stuff. This is all incredibly helpful! Thanks for sharing your insights.

    ReplyDelete
  50. Jody, that's a great checklist for revising those first pages. I took a workshop w/Jeanette Ingold and she said to use an eye-dropper to insert backstory where you need it in little bits. I love that image.

    ReplyDelete
  51. Jody, these are some great first chapter tips. I think reading through other writers stories would be a great way to learn more about our own writing--I know it's helped me in the past.

    I used to, and still do sometimes, struggle with a strong hook. I'm still learning to start the story in the exact right spot and not assume the reader needs to know more when they probably don't.

    ReplyDelete
  52. Great post - as usual. I have a short story that has been refusing to behave. I couldn't work out what it was. Now I realise it has far too much setting up time. I need to weave the past in using small fragments and teases, rather than make the past a proper scene.

    ReplyDelete
  53. Hi Jody -

    This is not only great insight for writers, but also for future contest judges. Thanks for giving us a peek into your evaluation process.

    Blessings,
    Susan :)

    ReplyDelete
  54. "Throw our characters into the story and for the first chapter pretend the reader already knows as much as we do."

    That's such a good way to phrase it. I know that's what we should do in a first chapter, but I've never seen it put quite that way. You just made it click a little tighter into focus for me. Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  55. Really nice points Jody. I'll be coming back to them time and time again. Too much back story in the first chapter and slow to introduce the conflict is a problem I see in WIP's, including mine. I believe you can judge a writer's skill from the first chapter.

    ReplyDelete
  56. Great food for thought, Jody. I think I can tell in a few chapters a writer's skill level. As for my own, it's hard to be objective so thank God for critters! Sometimes I wonder sometimes if I have too much going on in the first few chapters. I don't want a mountaintop and snowball down hill all the way.

    ReplyDelete
  57. Great list Jody. The first chapter is absolutely crucial. One either hooks or bores the reader.Thanks for the extremely useful points. They will help us in improving our first chapters.

    ReplyDelete
  58. Nice post! I do think a reader can get a good taste for the story from the first chapter. I think I'm probably guilty of cliches in my writing. *cringe*

    ReplyDelete
  59. Jody, Love the tip not to set up the story too much right away. The woman who is teaching the novel workshop I'm taking right now suggested we think about how the scene would look on film.

    Rarely on film is there a narrator giving us backstory right away. Instead, we're taken right into the scene, the characters' lives, the action.

    Great post. Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  60. The essence of the problem I have seen in judging contests and teaching writing workshops is CONFLICT.

    The first 15 pages must lay out the conflict, foreshadow the resolution at the ending (ending and beginning are intricately wound together by theme), state the theme, ask the salient question about the theme, and basically tell the reader what this story is actually about.

    All that has to be shown not told.

    Without the conflict-theme integration clearly in mind, no beginning writer has a chance of achieving that.

    What interests the beginning writer about their story is not what will interest a reader. Beginners have to learn to re-organize their material to get at those salient interesting points and present them up front, prior to the stuff that interests the writer.

    Lack of that skill at assembling points in order is what produces the endless, shapeless opening where the writer pushes all sorts of details of the backstory and worldbuilding at the reader with a feeling of "I'm going to tell you a great story, but FIRST YOU HAVE TO UNDERSTAND..."

    That's the single mistake that produces all the errors you've listed in this post.

    Conflict and Show Don't Tell are the hardest abstract notions to wrap your head around, and they represent the dividing line between sellable material and fanzine material.

    I talk about how to re-arrange your mind from reader to writer on the aliendjinnromances.blogspot.com co-blog (with 6 famous Romance writers) where I post on Tuesdays.

    Jacqueline Lichtenberg
    SF/F writer and reviewer
    http://jacquelinelichtenberg.com

    ReplyDelete
  61. A problem I've seen in first chapters is exposition in the dialogue/narrative, which goes along with what you're saying: "Readers don’t need to know how our characters got to the point they’re at." This is a great balancing scale to use for my first scene/chapter.

    ReplyDelete
  62. I loved the way you spelled out what you are looking at and realizing while judging this conest. :) How strange and exciting it must be for you to look back this past year and be the one holding the red pen. Good luck with your responsibilities!

    ReplyDelete
  63. Well, the beginning should give a thread to be followed, whether it be a complex character, a situation, the narrative formula...If the thread is well hidden and difficult to spot,chances are that it shall go unnoticed, the entire novel thus misfiring.
    Enjoy your reading the entries!

    ReplyDelete
  64. Thanks for sharing these tips with us! When I'm looking for a new book to read, I usually read (or scan through) the first chapter to get a feel for the story. I cannot stand reading a book with too much descriptive paragraphs and not enough dialogue, so that's one thing that will illuminate the book from my list. Also, if the other includes too many said tags, especially "he gasped/she screamed", that really annoys me. There was one book that I really wanted to read but I couldn't get into the story because for every dialogue line the author would include a said tag such as those.

    I also like it when I can relate to the character and the setting invites me to read the story from the first chapter. No one likes to read a story with a boring setting :)

    Great post!

    ReplyDelete
  65. Wow, girl! Your posts blow me away! So much great information!

    Again you combine knowledge in a kinda factual way with personal tweaks here and there that liven things up!!!

    Blessings,
    Patti

    ReplyDelete
  66. This is such a great post! It's difficult to hook readers with the first few pages, but definitely it's essential! :)

    ReplyDelete
  67. This was my first year judging the Genesis and I loved every minute. I noticed exactly the same things you mentioned (I have planned a blog post on this same topic) :-). Just praying the feedback I gave is helpful to the authors whose entries I judged. I know I've learned so much in the few years I've been entering contests.

    ReplyDelete
  68. I love the idea that you don't have to spell everything out for the reader in the beginning. Just generate interest. Thanks for the info.

    ReplyDelete
  69. Congrats on what you have achieved in a year!

    Excellent points. I have two story lines happening in my book. I found the first chapter lacked that big hook, so I switched it with chapter two, that introduced the other story line. Now I have the perfect first chapter!

    ReplyDelete
  70. Jody, Excellent instruction for authors and contest entrants. Here's a question: How much, if any, teaching is given to contest judges, along the lines of what you've shared here? I once had a contest judge mark me down hugely because I introduced a conflict (actually, more than one) that I did not resolve within the first 15 pages of the novel. The judge said I "kept the reader hanging." I thought that was a good thing! There's so much writers can learn from judges, and also so much that judges can teach other judges!

    Remind me that if in some future life, I am asked to judge a contest, I'll want to come to you first for some pointers. You'd be a great "teacher to the judges." I think judging requires a set of skills that you'd be great at imparting!

    ReplyDelete
  71. Thank you so much for this post! I am definitely going to be reading this post again several times!! :)
    thanks again!
    Kim

    ReplyDelete
  72. Thanks for the information in this post! I used it in my writing group last night.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for sharing it with your group, Christy! Glad it was helpful!

      Delete
  73. Not sure if I agree about assuming readers already know what the conflict is about. You know what I do if I don't know what the conflict is about from the first page? I toss the book. If I don't know the why of the conflict, then I don't care.

    ReplyDelete
  74. harder when shopping online because not all books have excerpts available for browsing. bubblegum casting

    ReplyDelete
  75. Again you combine knowledge in a kinda factual way with personal tweaks here and there that liven things up. bubblegum casting

    ReplyDelete
  76. I love the idea that you don't have to spell everything out for the reader in the beginning. Just generate interest. Thanks. bubblegum casting

    ReplyDelete
  77. I'm a beginning writer and even though I love books that hook me right from the off, I do like a LITTLE bit of prequel. Throwing readers right in at the deep end always makes me feel a little bit lost; sort of like Mary Connealy's writing. Even though I like her books, her writing style, the way she jumps from scene to scene with so little emotion and hardly any romance annoys me no end. Still, I'll give your ideas a try!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I like her guides, her way of composing, the way she leaps from field to field with so little feelings and hardly any romantic endeavors irritates me no end.google


      Delete
  78. i thought this was extremly helpful! i am writing a paper of the qualities of a great leader and george washington in particular. Hotelzimmer Mannheim

    ReplyDelete
  79. I must admit, Historical Romance is not my usual read either, but took a chance because of blogger reviews, and very happy I did. watchthisfree.com/

    ReplyDelete
  80. The character of George Washington remains his greatest quality and it was fundamental to setting the United States on the right path. Espresso Maker Reviews

    ReplyDelete
  81. Throwing readers right in at the deep end always makes me feel a little bit lost; sort of like Mary Connealy's writing. Even though I like her books, her writing style. Ian Filippini Santa Barbara

    ReplyDelete
  82. To those of you who posted that the post wasn't that helpful, I have updated it (as of February 19, 2011). Hopefully, you'll find the new post bettel. Seo Service

    ReplyDelete
  83. I'm writing a paper on George Washington's leadership strengths and this was perfect. high PR backlinks

    ReplyDelete
  84. It's more important now than ever. Especially in this digital age where we expect news and information fast. I recently read the first pages. seo barcelona

    ReplyDelete
  85. I see are slightly flawed but the story was all that mattered. Im hoping my novel will have that same effect. great article! just what I needed to hear right now. High PR Backlinks

    ReplyDelete
  86. It's more important now than ever. Especially in this digital age where we expect news and information fast. I recently read the first pages of "Of Mice and Men virgin mobile number

    ReplyDelete
  87. . Especially in this digital age where we expect news and information fast. I recently read the first pages of "Of Mice and Me contact t mobile

    ReplyDelete
  88. It's more important now than ever. Especially in this digital age where we expect news and information fast. I recently read the first pages. sky customer service

    ReplyDelete
  89. It should be noted that whilst ordering papers for sale at paper writing service,
    you can get unkind attitude. In case you feel that the bureau is trying to cheat samsung contact number

    ReplyDelete
  90. I must admit, Historical Romance is not my usual read either, but took a chance because of blogger reviews, and very happy I did. contact bt openreach

    ReplyDelete
  91. The best Skin Care products organized by lists of top ten for each category. We easy the process of searching for the right skin product for you npower customer service

    ReplyDelete
  92. I am pretty much happy with the contents you've got mentioned. I wished to thanks for this nice post. I enjoyed each little a part of it and that i are anticipating the new updates. wine refrigerator reviews

    ReplyDelete
  93. It's more important now than ever. Especially in this digital age where we expect news and information fast. contact natwest

    ReplyDelete
  94. It's more important now than ever. Especially in this digital age where we expect news and information fast. hmrc phone number

    ReplyDelete
  95. Thanks so much for sharing your useful information. I just started in this and I am getting to know it better! Cheers, keep up the good work esa contact number

    ReplyDelete
  96. It's more important now than ever. Especially in this digital age where we expect news and information fast. I recently read the first pages of contact ebay

    ReplyDelete
  97. La salud sexual y reproductiva de los y las adolescentes es motivo de preocupación de diferentes organismos de salud nacional e internacional. dla phone number

    ReplyDelete
  98. A very awesome blog post. We are really grateful for your blog post. i see you got really very useful topics , i will be always checking your blog thanks. cheap seo service

    ReplyDelete
  99. I get that same question, or "I don't know how you do it." I say that I don't do it all myself. I use the "Village. seo services barcelona

    ReplyDelete
  100. Very interesting to read this article.I would like to thank you for the efforts you had made for writing this awesome article Low OBL links

    ReplyDelete
  101. I wouldn’t mind producing a post or elaborating on a number of the subjects you write concerning here. Again, awesome Seo service Barcelona

    ReplyDelete
  102. I recently read the first pages of "Of Mice and Men." I wonder if that beginning, which is slow for today's standards, would have made it past the slush best usa backlinks

    ReplyDelete
  103. The info you provide on this site has helped me greatly. Thanks very much for this great article. This is a great inspiring article best usa backlinks

    ReplyDelete
  104. definitely enjoying every little bit of it. It is a great website and nice share. I want to thank you. Good job! You guys do a great blog, and have some great contents. Blog Comments

    ReplyDelete
  105. It's absolutely amazing and I definitely recommend this. The fasteners on the loop necklace thing had to be duct taped to stay togethe Weight loss. backlinks in cheap

    ReplyDelete
  106. Is there a place on tj´his or any other website that can translate Céline´french song to english, and I mean the right way. It is not always that they have the same meaning i english a french, that´s why i want the direct transfer. click for seo

    ReplyDelete
  107. I thought it was going to be some boring old post, but it really compensated for my time. I will post a link to this page on my blog. CPA Boca

    ReplyDelete
  108. I mean the right way. It is not always that they have the same meaning i english a french, that´s why i want the direct transfer beauty tips

    ReplyDelete
  109. Your style is unique compared to other people I have read stuff from.I appreciate you for posting when you have the opportunity, Guess I'll just book mark this site sky customer services phone number

    ReplyDelete
  110. The figures for New Hampshire surprise me as there was a decent mix of white and African Americans on campus when I studied at Keene State USA backlinks

    ReplyDelete
  111. I wouldn’t mind producing a post or elaborating on a number of the subjects you write concerning here. Again, awesome high pr backlinks

    ReplyDelete
  112. It is a great website and nice share. I want to thank you. Good job! You guys do a great blog, and have some great contents. Keep up the good work. SEO Conference

    ReplyDelete
  113. Austria was modelling itself on the French Empire and Prussian militancy was firmly established and set to cast its shadow over the next hundred years mail ghost

    ReplyDelete
  114. I really appreciate that you submitted this nowadays and assisted me very much with this details. Keep going like this, my man. high pr backlinks

    ReplyDelete
  115. I used to work in electroplating they sometimes encouraged us to write, but I could never come up with something as well written as that Seo services

    ReplyDelete
  116. This was a really great contest and hopefully I can attend the next one. It was alot of fun and I really enjoyed myself. barcelona seo

    ReplyDelete
  117. I do think you should consider a little more about individual previous to composing about it. high pr backlinks

    ReplyDelete
  118. I’m a little lost on everything. Would you suggest starting with a free vinevera skincare

    ReplyDelete
  119. i agree with this comment pron movies leave bad impact on young generation. Cheap seo service

    ReplyDelete
  120. It is then our intention to start the transition at two per month. Logistically it takes time to swap out a technician to a new van and we do not want to overwhelm ourselves, although the sooner we switch the sooner we start saving.”There is no room for the power/charge cord, the oil bottle, or the brush. old school new body

    ReplyDelete
  121. I am writing a paper of the qualities of a great leader and george washington in particular. it gave me a general understanding hotels manchester

    ReplyDelete
  122. I want to thank you. Good job! You guys do a great blog, and have some great contents. Keep up the good work manchester hotels

    ReplyDelete
  123. You're in point of fact a just right webmaster. The website loading speed is amazing. Buy backlinks

    ReplyDelete
  124. Thanks for sharing nice information . i like your post and all you share with us is uptodate and quite informative, Seo in Boca

    ReplyDelete
  125. I want to thank you. Good job! You guys do a great blog, and have some great contents. Keep up the good work watch the simpsons online

    ReplyDelete
  126. I’m a little lost on everything. Would you suggest starting with a free watch fairytail online

    ReplyDelete
  127. There is no reason why a plumber can’t lead the way and set the example. The electric motor is two to five times more efficient than a diesel engine Seo in Boca

    ReplyDelete
  128. I was exactly searching for. Great work.Thanks for such post and please keep it up. easy weight loss

    ReplyDelete
  129. I was exactly searching for. Great work.Thanks for such post and please keep it up. Weight loss

    ReplyDelete
  130. it has been months for me. Nicely this article that i've been waited for so long. seo barcelona

    ReplyDelete
  131. it has been months for me. Nicely this article that i've been waited for so long. it has been months for me. Nicely this article that i've been waited for so long. seo barcelona

    ReplyDelete
  132. It consists of wonderful and useful posts. I've read many of them and also got so much from them cheap seo barcelona

    ReplyDelete
  133. I have never visited any site about mad ud af huset like this. I would like to bookmark this link and share to all my friend as well Phonesheriff

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This is a excellent story. Thanks! You completed a few nice points there http://phonesheriffapp.com

      Delete
  134. However, since there are a lot of functions available, you may want to try a more conventional way of record your home so that it gets more interest from potential customers and removes the need for you to keep several showings. House Buyer Bureau

    ReplyDelete
  135. i am from this post the person who create this post it was a great human..thanks for shared this with us. seo in barcelona

    ReplyDelete
  136. i am from this post the person who create this post it was a great human..thanks for shared this with us. seo in spain

    ReplyDelete
  137. This really is a wonderful posting, thanks a lot for telling.I am looking forward to discover more fantastic blog posts as this one particular! mobistealth reviews

    ReplyDelete
  138. This really is a wonderful posting, thanks a lot for telling.I am looking forward to discover more fantastic blog posts as this one particular! mobistealth reviews

    ReplyDelete
  139. Thanks for sharing. It's late finding this act. At least, it's a thing to be familiar with that there are such events exist. click here

    ReplyDelete
  140. It is incomprehensible to me now, but in overall, the usefulness and significance is overwhelming seo boca

    ReplyDelete
  141. This is a excellent story. Thanks! You completed a few nice points there seo in boca raton

    ReplyDelete
  142. You can invite teachers, parents and children at your elementary school to join Roof cleaning services

    ReplyDelete
  143. Single mothers have a higher labor force participation rate than married women with children Newyork roof cleaning

    ReplyDelete
  144. the imposition of several requirements as conditio sine qua non for such commitments, was not far from reality at all mud for sales

    ReplyDelete
  145. the imposition of several requirements as conditio sine qua non for such commitments, was not far from reality at all sale mud here

    ReplyDelete
  146. That process makes a lot of people feel icky no matter what they're selling, including me Best Drug Rehabilitation

    ReplyDelete
  147. That process makes a lot of people feel icky no matter what they're selling, including me best drug rehab center manistee review

    ReplyDelete
  148. Unfortunately, some of Ann's accounts don't jibe with other records from the Revolutionary War period, calling many of them into question. Read more

    ReplyDelete
  149. Unfortunately, some of Ann's accounts don't jibe with other records from the Revolutionary War period, calling many of them into question. six degree flow download

    ReplyDelete
  150. I am writing a paper of the qualities of a great leader and george washington in particularbest online stock trading

    ReplyDelete
  151. I am writing a paper of the qualities of a great leader and george washington in particular best online brokerage

    ReplyDelete
  152. I found so many exciting aspects in your weblog site web page website web page website, especially its discussion comparaison mutuelle

    ReplyDelete
  153. I found so many exciting aspects in your weblog site web page website web page website, especially its discussion comparaison mutuelle

    ReplyDelete
  154. My knowledge base.Admiring the time and effort you put into your blog and detailed information you offer camomile tea

    ReplyDelete
  155. This is wrong. They are not crying anymore. They can manage and handle every big duties for a big company nowadays. chamomile tea benefits

    ReplyDelete
  156. I am writing a paper of the qualities of a great leader and george washington in particular. Money Making Conference

    ReplyDelete
  157. I am writing a paper of the qualities of a great leader and george washington in particular. Money Making Conference

    ReplyDelete
  158. I would like to bookmark this link and share to all my friend as well seo in spain

    ReplyDelete
  159. I would like to bookmark this link and share to all my friend as well seo in spain

    ReplyDelete
  160. The advices in this post are very helpful and I surely will read the other posts of this series too. boca seo

    ReplyDelete
  161. The advices in this post are very helpful and I surely will read the other posts of this series too. seo boca raton

    ReplyDelete
  162. I am hopeful the same best work from you as well. Actually your creative writing abilities has motivated me seo in boca

    ReplyDelete
  163. I am found which I actually want. I check your blog everyday and try to learn something from your blog boca raton seo

    ReplyDelete
  164. I just want to let you know that I just check out your site and I find it very interesting and informative. local seo company

    ReplyDelete
  165. I am new to weblog and definitely liked this blog site. Very likely I’m going to bookmark your blog. PPC advertising

    ReplyDelete
  166. I am launching a website soon, and your information will be very useful for me.. Ungagged

    ReplyDelete
  167. I really enjoyed the article. It proved to be Very helpful to me and I am sure to all the commenters Vegas Conference

    ReplyDelete
  168. My knowledge base.Admiring the time and effort you put into your blog and detailed information you offer Vegas Conference

    ReplyDelete
  169. It is such an important topic and ignored by so many, even professionals. professionals. I thank you to help making people more aware of possible issues. Vegas Conference

    ReplyDelete
  170. It is such an important topic and ignored by so many, even professionals. professionals. I thank you to help making people more aware of possible issues. SEO Conference

    ReplyDelete
  171. I was pleased to see I had thought through the ones on your list. Thanks Jody. Great post as always Vegas Conference

    ReplyDelete
  172. I'm still not enjoying it to its full potential. I'll have to sink some money into a good gaming rig, before I can enjoy the best of its graphics Ungagged

    ReplyDelete
  173. I can see how valuable having more stitch options is going to be and I've already started using some of them. Read here

    ReplyDelete
  174. Think of centrally managing locks, lighting, security cameras, thermostats and natural lighting. dota 2 map hack

    ReplyDelete
  175. It’s simple, yet effective. A lot of times it’s hard to get that “perfect balance” between user friendliness and visual appearance. dota 2 hack blog

    ReplyDelete
  176. Your use of formatting when making your points makes your observations very clear and easy to understand. Thank you. Weight loss Calculator

    ReplyDelete
  177. I think you spend numerous effort and time updating your blog. I have bookmarked it. Pr backlinks

    ReplyDelete
  178. I will forward this page to him. Fairly certain he will have a good read SEO in cheap

    ReplyDelete
  179. I care about what I said just now scale of civilization - how are you this big treat your weakness and minority, how do you disagree inclusive dissidents seo barcelona

    ReplyDelete
  180. I had been on the front lines of vaccine education and awareness, continually partnering with families to protect children. And out of nowhere, measles arrived. seo spain

    ReplyDelete
  181. I had been on the front lines of vaccine education and awareness, continually partnering with families to protect children. SEO in cheap

    ReplyDelete
  182. I thank you to help making people more aware of possible issues seo barcelona

    ReplyDelete
  183. it was another joy to see It is such an important topic and ignored by so many, even professionals. professionals seo in barcelona

    ReplyDelete
  184. It easy for me to understand and implement the concept. Thank you for the post seo in barcelona

    ReplyDelete
  185. I don’t actually comment and don’t like to spend time in typing the comment. vine vera seo spain

    ReplyDelete
  186. I don’t actually comment and don’t like to spend time in typing the comment. vine vera seo in barcelona

    ReplyDelete
  187. Through the information you include but today’s blog would be the most appreciable spain seo

    ReplyDelete
  188. I don’t actually comment and don’t like to spend time in typing the comment. vine vera clash of clans cheats

    ReplyDelete
  189. I am looking forward to reading new articles. Keep up the good work. download clash of clans hack

    ReplyDelete
  190. I am new to weblog and definitely liked this blog site. Very likely I’m going to bookmark your blog quality backlinks

    ReplyDelete
  191. He was quite the dandy,excellent horseman,great dancer,had a hand made liquor cabinet and other great things sent from England barcelona seo

    ReplyDelete
  192. It is a great website and nice share. I want to thank you. Good job! You guys do a great blog easy house movers

    ReplyDelete
  193. I found your website perfect for my needs. It contains wonderful and helpful posts. Keep up the good work! miami CPA

    ReplyDelete
  194. I won’t think twice to endorse your blog post to anybody who wants and needs support about this area. easy house movers

    ReplyDelete
  195. I thought I would leave my first comment. I don’t know what to say except that I have enjoyed reading. CPA boca raton

    ReplyDelete
  196. I am new to weblog and definitely liked this blog site. Very likely I’m going to bookmark your blog . miami CPA

    ReplyDelete
  197. I am looking forward to reading new articles. Keep up the good work miami house movers

    ReplyDelete

© All the articles in this blog are copyrighted and may not be used without prior written consent from the author. You may quote without permission if you give proper credit and links. Thank you!